Legal Realist Innovation in the Wisconsin Law School Curriculum 1950-1970: Four Influential Introductory Courses presentation materials

As a part of the University of Wisconsin Law School's 150th anniversary celebrations, Professor William Clune conducted extensive research and recorded new interviews to write a new paper to highlight a particuarly vibrant period of the Law School's history. In his paper, Professor Clune discusses the groundbreaking importance of four influential classes that were created during the twenty-year span from 1950-1970.

Professor Clune focused on two classes primarily taught by Professor Williard Hurst: Legal Process and Legal History as well as Criminal Justice Administration (created and taught by Professors Frank Remington and Herman Goldstein) and Contracts, as reimagined by Professors Stewart Macaulay and William Whitford, among others.

The paper was presented at a March 8, 2019 symposium at the Unversity of Wisconsin Law School. Professor Clune's PowerPoint presentation, with embedded audio and an autoplay feature is linked below.

The paper written by Professor Clune is also linked below as well as a working paper based on the presentation given by Professor Hendrik Hartog about Williard Hurst and interviews with professors who have the classes discussed in the past and are teaching them presently.

*Article written by Professor William Clune: Legal Realist Innovation in the Wisconsin Law School Curriculum 1950-1970: Four Influential Introductory Courses

*Article written by Professor Hendrik Hartog: Three Fragments on Doing Legal History, or Wililard Hurst and Me

*Article written by Professor Malcolm M. Feeley: Reflections on Frank Remington , the ABF Survey, and the Wisconsin Law School

*PowerPoint Presentation: Legal Realist Innovation in the Wisconsin Law School Curriculum 1950-1970: Four Influential Introductory Courses

*Interview with Professors Cecelia Klingele and Keith Findley

*Interview with Professor Herman Goldstein

*Interview with Professor Walter Dickey

*Interview with Professors Stewart Macaulay and William Whitford